Slide 1

Training

Related websites


Blogs worth visiting


Bibliography

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Acord & Equinix.  Challenge to Change Part 1: Embracing the Economy, Poeple and the Future of Insurance.  Industry report, Equinix, 2014, 1-17.

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Acord & Equinix.  Challenge to Change Part 3 - The Future of Insurance.  Industry report, Equinix, 2014, 1-19.

Adams, John.  Risk.  Psychology Press, 1995.

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Get More From Your Data With Predictive Analytics: Half Day Course 

Course Dates:

Appreciation: 
Thursday, 14.00-17.30, 12 October 2017







Accessible ways to get more value from your data

Tools and techniques that help businesses get more value from even incomplete or patchy data are now freely available and accessible to all types of organisations. Attend this intensive course to find out in just half a day, what you need to know about these analytical techniques, how they are being used and what questions you should ask to start using them in your organisation now.

PLUS: Gain practical experience on the associated course on Basics of Predictive Analytics.

This successful client training programme is newly available to organisations of all sizes and kinds. Learn how you can:

  • improve customer revenue and retention,
  • reduce volumes of unsuccessful contacts,
  • predict product performance,
  • reduce errors and manual input in transaction processing.

Who are these courses for? 

There are two types of course available, which can be booked independently or together.

The Appreciation Course is designed for senior managers and information leaders who want to appreciate how predictive analytics could help them create more value from their data. Participants don’t need to be mathematics or software experts. The course explains why they need to know about predictive analytics and tells them what they need to know to ask the right questions and understand the answers.

The Basics Course is also suitable for those who might attend the Appreciation Course, as well as information professionals who want to revise and/or start using these techniques in earnest.

What will you learn?

Each course is run as a workshop, with some presentations, but also games, simulations and practical exercises. Courses have no more than 10 participants who work in groups where discussion and shared learning is encouraged.

The Appreciation Course covers:

  • What is predictive analytics and examples of how it has helped different organisations
  • Strengths and weaknesses of different platforms
  • Business problem solving using data
  • Preventing customer churn  
  • Techniques for portfolio analysis
  • Common mistakes in utilising data for decision-making
  • How to work with simulation and modelling
  • Application of predictive analytics to Marketing - business effectiveness
  • Limitations of Predictive Analytics

The Basics Course will have you building models and making predictions, using real data from actual scenarios. You will leave able to access predictive analytics tools and use them to explore your data.

Course Leaders

The course is led by Z/Yen’s experienced Predictive Analytics Leads: Ian Harris and Mark Yeandle. With more than 4 decades of experience between them, Ian and Mark have been in the forefront of developing Predictive Analytics for clients in that time.

 

Course Leaders


Ian Harris, Director


Mark Yeandle
Senior Consultant

 

Venue

Z/Yen Group Limited, 41 Lothbury, London, EC2R 7HF (Directions)

 

BOOK NOW

Further Reading: Machine Learning and Professional Work - A Lookahead to 2040

 

 
 
 

Get More From Your Data With Predictive Analytics: Half Day Course 

Course Dates:

Appreciation: 
Wednesday, 09.30-13.30, 12 July 2017







Accessible ways to get more value from your data

Tools and techniques that help businesses get more value from even incomplete or patchy data are now freely available and accessible to all types of organisations. Attend this intensive course to find out in just half a day, what you need to know about these analytical techniques, how they are being used and what questions you should ask to start using them in your organisation now.

PLUS: Gain practical experience on the associated course on Basics of Predictive Analytics.

This successful client training programme is newly available to organisations of all sizes and kinds. Learn how you can:

  • improve customer revenue and retention,
  • reduce volumes of unsuccessful contacts,
  • predict product performance,
  • reduce errors and manual input in transaction processing.

Who are these courses for? 

There are two types of course available, which can be booked independently or together.

The Appreciation Course is designed for senior managers and information leaders who want to appreciate how predictive analytics could help them create more value from their data. Participants don’t need to be mathematics or software experts. The course explains why they need to know about predictive analytics and tells them what they need to know to ask the right questions and understand the answers.

The Basics Course is also suitable for those who might attend the Appreciation Course, as well as information professionals who want to revise and/or start using these techniques in earnest.

What will you learn?

Each course is run as a workshop, with some presentations, but also games, simulations and practical exercises. Courses have no more than 10 participants who work in groups where discussion and shared learning is encouraged.

The Appreciation Course covers:

  • What is predictive analytics and examples of how it has helped different organisations
  • Strengths and weaknesses of different platforms
  • Business problem solving using data
  • Preventing customer churn  
  • Techniques for portfolio analysis
  • Common mistakes in utilising data for decision-making
  • How to work with simulation and modelling
  • Application of predictive analytics to Marketing - business effectiveness
  • Limitations of Predictive Analytics

The Basics Course will have you building models and making predictions, using real data from actual scenarios. You will leave able to access predictive analytics tools and use them to explore your data.

Course Leaders

The course is led by Z/Yen’s experienced Predictive Analytics Leads: Ian Harris and Mark Yeandle. With more than 4 decades of experience between them, Ian and Mark have been in the forefront of developing Predictive Analytics for clients in that time.

 

Course Leaders


Ian Harris, Director


Mark Yeandle
Senior Consultant

 

Venue

Z/Yen Group Limited, 41 Lothbury, London, EC2R 7HF (Directions)

 

BOOK NOW

Further Reading: Machine Learning and Professional Work - A Lookahead to 2040

 

 
 
 

Get More From Your Data With Predictive Analytics: Half Day Course 

Course Dates:

Appreciation: 
Thursday, 09.30-13.30, 16 November 2017







Accessible ways to get more value from your data

Tools and techniques that help businesses get more value from even incomplete or patchy data are now freely available and accessible to all types of organisations. Attend this intensive course to find out in just half a day, what you need to know about these analytical techniques, how they are being used and what questions you should ask to start using them in your organisation now.

PLUS: Gain practical experience on the associated course on Basics of Predictive Analytics.

This successful client training programme is newly available to organisations of all sizes and kinds. Learn how you can:

  • improve customer revenue and retention,
  • reduce volumes of unsuccessful contacts,
  • predict product performance,
  • reduce errors and manual input in transaction processing.

Who are these courses for? 

There are two types of course available, which can be booked independently or together.

The Appreciation Course is designed for senior managers and information leaders who want to appreciate how predictive analytics could help them create more value from their data. Participants don’t need to be mathematics or software experts. The course explains why they need to know about predictive analytics and tells them what they need to know to ask the right questions and understand the answers.

The Basics Course is also suitable for those who might attend the Appreciation Course, as well as information professionals who want to revise and/or start using these techniques in earnest.

What will you learn?

Each course is run as a workshop, with some presentations, but also games, simulations and practical exercises. Courses have no more than 10 participants who work in groups where discussion and shared learning is encouraged.

The Appreciation Course covers:

  • What is predictive analytics and examples of how it has helped different organisations
  • Strengths and weaknesses of different platforms
  • Business problem solving using data
  • Preventing customer churn  
  • Techniques for portfolio analysis
  • Common mistakes in utilising data for decision-making
  • How to work with simulation and modelling
  • Application of predictive analytics to Marketing - business effectiveness
  • Limitations of Predictive Analytics

The Basics Course will have you building models and making predictions, using real data from actual scenarios. You will leave able to access predictive analytics tools and use them to explore your data.

Course Leaders

The course is led by Z/Yen’s experienced Predictive Analytics Leads: Ian Harris and Mark Yeandle. With more than 4 decades of experience between them, Ian and Mark have been in the forefront of developing Predictive Analytics for clients in that time.

 

Course Leaders


Ian Harris, Director


Mark Yeandle
Senior Consultant

 

Venue

Z/Yen Group Limited, 41 Lothbury, London, EC2R 7HF (Directions)

 

BOOK NOW

Further Reading: Machine Learning and Professional Work - A Lookahead to 2040

 

 
 
 

Get More From Your Data With Predictive Analytics: Half Day Course 

Course Dates:

Appreciation: 
Tuesday, 14.00-17.30, 12 September 2017







Accessible ways to get more value from your data

Tools and techniques that help businesses get more value from even incomplete or patchy data are now freely available and accessible to all types of organisations. Attend this intensive course to find out in just half a day, what you need to know about these analytical techniques, how they are being used and what questions you should ask to start using them in your organisation now.

PLUS: Gain practical experience on the associated course on Basics of Predictive Analytics.

This successful client training programme is newly available to organisations of all sizes and kinds. Learn how you can:

  • improve customer revenue and retention,
  • reduce volumes of unsuccessful contacts,
  • predict product performance,
  • reduce errors and manual input in transaction processing.

Who are these courses for? 

There are two types of course available, which can be booked independently or together.

The Appreciation Course is designed for senior managers and information leaders who want to appreciate how predictive analytics could help them create more value from their data. Participants don’t need to be mathematics or software experts. The course explains why they need to know about predictive analytics and tells them what they need to know to ask the right questions and understand the answers.

The Basics Course is also suitable for those who might attend the Appreciation Course, as well as information professionals who want to revise and/or start using these techniques in earnest.

What will you learn?

Each course is run as a workshop, with some presentations, but also games, simulations and practical exercises. Courses have no more than 10 participants who work in groups where discussion and shared learning is encouraged.

The Appreciation Course covers:

  • What is predictive analytics and examples of how it has helped different organisations
  • Strengths and weaknesses of different platforms
  • Business problem solving using data
  • Preventing customer churn  
  • Techniques for portfolio analysis
  • Common mistakes in utilising data for decision-making
  • How to work with simulation and modelling
  • Application of predictive analytics to Marketing - business effectiveness
  • Limitations of Predictive Analytics

The Basics Course will have you building models and making predictions, using real data from actual scenarios. You will leave able to access predictive analytics tools and use them to explore your data.

Course Leaders

The course is led by Z/Yen’s experienced Predictive Analytics Leads: Ian Harris and Mark Yeandle. With more than 4 decades of experience between them, Ian and Mark have been in the forefront of developing Predictive Analytics for clients in that time.

 

Course Leaders


Ian Harris, Director


Mark Yeandle
Senior Consultant

 

Venue

Z/Yen Group Limited, 41 Lothbury, London, EC2R 7HF (Directions)

 

BOOK NOW

Further Reading: Machine Learning and Professional Work - A Lookahead to 2040